Download Representations of Death in Nineteenth-Century US Writing and Culture PDF

Representations of Death in Nineteenth-Century US Writing and Culture

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781351150224
Pages : 246 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (15 downloads)

Download Representations of Death in Nineteenth-Century US Writing and Culture PDF Format Full Free by Lucy Frank and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2018-01-18 with total page 246 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From the famous deathbed scene of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Little Eva to Mark Twain's parodically morbid poetess Emmeline Grangerford, a preoccupation with human finitude informs the texture of nineteenth-century US writing. This collection traces the vicissitudes of this cultural preoccupation with the subject of death and examines how mortality served paradoxically as a site on which identity and subjectivity were productively rethought. Contributors from North America and the United Kingdom, representing the fields of literature, theatre history, and American studies, analyze the sexual, social, and epistemological boundaries implicit in nineteenth-century America's obsession with death, while also seeking to give a voice to the strategies by which these boundaries were interrogated and displaced. Topics include race- and gender-based investigations into the textual representation of death, imaginative constructions and re-constructions of social practice with regard to loss and memorialisation, and literary re-conceptualisations of death forced by personal and national trauma.

Download Death Becomes Her PDF

Death Becomes Her

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Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781443810746
Pages : 200 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (81 downloads)

Download Death Becomes Her PDF Format Full Free by Elizabeth Dill and published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. This book was released on 2009-05-05 with total page 200 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Dead and dying women are surely an age-old narrative trope. While associations of femininity with death have become almost prototypical in literary criticism and are familiar fodder for cultural conversations, the editors of Death Becomes Her offer us an opportunity to investigate the values that underlie such associations. But from where does our tireless investment in what constitutes a feminine death, a feminine reaction to death, and death’s courting of women emerge? These essays give voice to the idea that power and victimization are not opposites, but rather are complements in an operatic fantasy of intrigue, agency, absence and presence that pervades American writing and experience. Each chapter of Death Becomes Her offers a different lens to investigate the nature of death as surely more than just an anatomical matter: The penny press obsessively covers the death of a beautiful prostitute in 1840s Chicago; a novel of seduction becomes also a narrative of autopsy; a story of haunting allows women outlets for sexual license and the polemics of desire. Overall this volume invites readers to explore the ways in which death is portrayed as both an ornamentation of femininity and an ontological reality of it: how, put simply, “death becomes her.” Essays include analyses of women’s deathbed scenes, suicides, murders, funerals, and autopsies in literature and other nineteenth-century media. As such, the chapters in Death Becomes Her show how the authorial and readerly interest in scripting and staging women’s deaths is both intricate and abiding. They tell us that death is never, of course, simply about death, and they make relevant other issues, from linguistics to politics, as they inform the literature and lives of women from the late-eighteenth to early twentieth-century America. Taken together, the pieces in Death Becomes Her allow us greater access to the surrounding culture out of which the American woman emerges, performs, lives and dies. In doing so, they offer fresh insight into the often unsettling and highly relevant role of death in feminism.

Download Nineteenth-Century American Women Write Religion PDF

Nineteenth-Century American Women Write Religion

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781317087366
Pages : 200 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (87 downloads)

Download Nineteenth-Century American Women Write Religion PDF Format Full Free by Mary McCartin Wearn and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-05-06 with total page 200 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Nineteenth-century American women’s culture was immersed in religious experience and female authors of the era employed representations of faith to various cultural ends. Focusing primarily on non-canonical texts, this collection explores the diversity of religious discourse in nineteenth-century women’s literature. The contributors examine fiction, political writings, poetry, and memoirs by professional authors, social activists, and women of faith, including Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Harriet E. Wilson, Sarah Piatt, Julia Ward Howe, Julia A. J. Foote, Lucy Mack Smith, Rebecca Cox Jackson, and Fanny Newell. Embracing the complexities of lived religion in women’s culture-both its repressive and its revolutionary potential-Nineteenth-Century American Women Write Religion articulates how American women writers adopted the language of religious sentiment for their own cultural, political, or spiritual ends.

Download Gothic Utterance PDF

Gothic Utterance

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Publisher : University of Wales Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781786837554
Pages : 256 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (837 downloads)

Download Gothic Utterance PDF Format Full Free by Jimmy Packham and published by University of Wales Press. This book was released on 2021-06-15 with total page 256 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Gothic has always been interested in strange utterances and unsettling voices – from half-heard ghostly murmurings and the admonitions of the dead, to the terrible cries of the monstrous nonhuman. Gothic Utterance is the first book-length study of the role played by such voices in the Gothic tradition, exploring their prominence and importance in the American literature produced between the Revolutionary War and the close of the nineteenth century. The book argues that the American Gothic foregrounds the overpowering affect and distressing significations of the voices of the dead, dying, abjected, marginalised or nonhuman, in order to undertake a sustained interrogation of what it means to be and speak as an American in this period. The American Gothic imagines new forms of relation between speaking subjects, positing more inclusive and expansive kinds of community, while also emphasising the ethical demands attending our encounters with Gothic voices. The Gothic suggests that how we choose to hear and respond to these voices says much about our relationship with the world around us, its inhabitants – dead or otherwise – and the limits of our own subjectivity and empathy.

Download Speaking with the Dead in Early America PDF

Speaking with the Dead in Early America

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Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780812296419
Pages : 344 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (296 downloads)

Download Speaking with the Dead in Early America PDF Format Full Free by Erik R. Seeman and published by University of Pennsylvania Press. This book was released on 2019-10-04 with total page 344 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In late medieval Catholicism, mourners employed an array of practices to maintain connection with the deceased—most crucially, the belief in purgatory, a middle place between heaven and hell where souls could be helped by the actions of the living. In the early sixteenth century, the Reformation abolished purgatory, as its leaders did not want attention to the dead diminishing people's devotion to God. But while the Reformation was supposed to end communication between the living and dead, it turns out the result was in fact more complicated than historians have realized. In the three centuries after the Reformation, Protestants imagined continuing relationships with the dead, and the desire for these relations came to form an important—and since neglected—aspect of Protestant belief and practice. In Speaking with the Dead in Early America, historian Erik R. Seeman undertakes a 300-year history of Protestant communication with the dead. Seeman chronicles the story of Protestants' relationships with the deceased from Elizabethan England to puritan New England and then on through the American Enlightenment into the middle of the nineteenth century with the explosion of interest in Spiritualism. He brings together a wide range of sources to uncover the beliefs and practices of both ordinary people, especially women, and religious leaders. This prodigious research reveals how sermons, elegies, and epitaphs portrayed the dead as speaking or being spoken to, how ghost stories and Gothic fiction depicted a permeable boundary between this world and the next, and how parlor songs and funeral hymns encouraged singers to imagine communication with the dead. Speaking with the Dead in Early America thus boldly reinterprets Protestantism as a religion in which the dead played a central role.

Download Arcadian America PDF

Arcadian America

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Publisher : Yale University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780300189056
Pages : 480 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (189 downloads)

Download Arcadian America PDF Format Full Free by Aaron Sachs and published by Yale University Press. This book was released on 2013-01-08 with total page 480 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Perhaps America's best environmental idea was not the national park but the garden cemetery, a use of space that quickly gained popularity in the mid-nineteenth century. Such spaces of repose brought key elements of the countryside into rapidly expanding cities, making nature accessible to all and serving to remind visitors of the natural cycles of life. In this unique interdisciplinary blend of historical narrative, cultural criticism, and poignant memoir, Aaron Sachs argues that American cemeteries embody a forgotten landscape tradition that has much to teach us in our current moment of environmental crisis. Until the trauma of the Civil War, many Americans sought to shape society into what they thought of as an Arcadia--not an Eden where fruit simply fell off the tree, but a public garden that depended on an ethic of communal care, and whose sense of beauty and repose related directly to an acknowledgement of mortality and limitation. Sachs explores the notion of Arcadia in the works of nineteenth-century nature writers, novelists, painters, horticulturists, landscape architects, and city planners, and holds up for comparison the twenty-first century's--and his own--tendency toward denial of both death and environmental limits. His far-reaching insights suggest new possibilities for the environmental movement today and new ways of understanding American history.

Download Networking the Nation PDF

Networking the Nation

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Publisher : OUP Oxford
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ISBN 10 : 9780191035456
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (35 downloads)

Download Networking the Nation PDF Format Full Free by Alison Chapman and published by OUP Oxford. This book was released on 2015-07-16 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: How did nineteenth-century women's poetry shift from the poetess poetry of lyric effusion and hyper-femininity to the muscular epic of Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh? Networking the Nation re-writes women's poetic traditions by demonstrating the debt that Barrett Browning's revolutionary poetics owed to a circle of American and British women poets living in Florence and campaigning in their poetry and in their salons for Italian Unification. These women poets—Isa Blagden, Elizabeth Kinney, Eliza Ogilvy, and Theodosia Garrow Trollope—formed with Barrett Browning a network of poetry, sociability, and politics, which was devoted to the mission of campaigning for Italy as an independent nation state. In their poetic experiments with the active lyric voice, in their forging of a transnational persona through the periodical press, in their salons and spiritualist séances, the women poets formed a network that attempted to assert and perform an independent unified Italy in their work. Networking the Nation maps the careers of these expatriate women poets who were based in Florence in the key years of Risorgimento politics, racing their transnational social and print communities, and the problematic but schismatic shift in their poetry from the conventional sphere of the poetess. In the fraught and thrilling engagement with their adopted nation's revolutionary turmoil, and in their experiments with different types of writing agency, the women poets in this book offer revolutions of other kinds: revolutions of women's poetry and the very act of writing.

Download Discovering Quacks, Utopias, and Cemeteries PDF

Discovering Quacks, Utopias, and Cemeteries

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Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
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ISBN 10 : 9781475832068
Pages : 154 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (832 downloads)

Download Discovering Quacks, Utopias, and Cemeteries PDF Format Full Free by Cynthia Williams Resor and published by Rowman & Littlefield. This book was released on 2019-06-21 with total page 154 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Discovering Quacks, Utopias, and Cemeteries: Modern Lessons from Historical Themes​explores two enduring issues – our age-old pursuit of better lives and how the media impacts our choices. In this unique approach to social history, each chapter opens with essential questions asking the reader to consider these issues in historical and modern life.

Download Grief and Genre in American Literature, 1790–1870 PDF

Grief and Genre in American Literature, 1790–1870

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781317124481
Pages : 200 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (124 downloads)

Download Grief and Genre in American Literature, 1790–1870 PDF Format Full Free by Desirée Henderson and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-04-15 with total page 200 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Focusing on the role of genre in the formation of dominant conceptions of death and dying, Desirée Henderson examines literary texts and social spaces devoted to death and mourning in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century America. Henderson shows how William Hill Brown, Susanna Rowson, and Hannah Webster borrowed from and challenged funeral sermon conventions in their novelistic portrayals of the deaths of fallen women; contrasts the eulogies for George Washington with William Apess's "Eulogy for King Philip" to expose conflicts between national ideology and indigenous history; examines Frederick Douglass's use of the slave cemetery to represent the costs of slavery for African American families; suggests that the ideas about democracy materialized in Civil War cemeteries and monuments influenced Walt Whitman's war elegies; and offers new contexts for analyzing Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's The Gates Ajar and Emily Dickinson's poetry as works that explore the consequences of female writers claiming authority over the mourning process. Informed by extensive archival research, Henderson's study eloquently speaks to the ways in which authors adopted, revised, or rejected the conventions of memorial literature, choices that disclose their location within decisive debates about appropriate gender roles and sexual practices, national identity and citizenship, the consequences of slavery, the nature of democratic representation, and structures of authorship and literary authority.

Download Old Style PDF

Old Style

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Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780812253535
Pages : 288 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (253 downloads)

Download Old Style PDF Format Full Free by Claudia Stokes and published by University of Pennsylvania Press. This book was released on 2021 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: We celebrate innovation and experimentation, but Claudia Stokes reminds us that nineteenth-century American writers instead valued familiarity and traditionalism, which provided reliable markers of literary quality. Old Style examines the varied uses and expressions of unoriginality, which helped credential marginalized writers.

Download Mourning Lincoln PDF

Mourning Lincoln

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Publisher : Yale University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780300213560
Pages : 408 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (213 downloads)

Download Mourning Lincoln PDF Format Full Free by Martha Hodes and published by Yale University Press. This book was released on 2015-02-24 with total page 408 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A historian examines how everyday people reacted to the president’s assassination in this “highly original, lucidly written book” (James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom). The news of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination on April 15, 1865, just days after Confederate surrender, astounded a war-weary nation. Massive crowds turned out for services and ceremonies. Countless expressions of grief and dismay were printed in newspapers and preached in sermons. Public responses to the assassination have been well chronicled, but this book is the first to delve into the personal and intimate responses of everyday people—northerners and southerners, soldiers and civilians, black people and white, men and women, rich and poor. Exploring diaries, letters, and other personal writings penned during the spring and summer of 1865, historian Martha Hodes captures the full range of reactions to the president’s death—far more diverse than public expressions would suggest. She tells a story of shock, glee, sorrow, anger, blame, and fear. “’Tis the saddest day in our history,” wrote a mournful man. It was “an electric shock to my soul,” wrote a woman who had escaped from slavery. “Glorious News!” a Lincoln enemy exulted, while for the black soldiers of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts, it was all “too overwhelming, too lamentable, too distressing” to absorb. Longlisted for the National Book Award, Mourning Lincoln brings to life a key moment of national uncertainty and confusion, when competing visions of America’s future proved irreconcilable and hopes for racial justice in the aftermath of the Civil War slipped from the nation’s grasp. Hodes masterfully explores the tragedy of Lincoln’s assassination in human terms—terms that continue to stagger and rivet us today.

Download Suicide Century PDF

Suicide Century

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108418041
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (418 downloads)

Download Suicide Century PDF Format Full Free by Andrew Bennett and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2017-10-05 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Suicide Century investigates suicide as an increasingly 'normalised' but still deeply traumatic and profoundly baffling act in twentieth-century writing.

Download Fair Copy PDF

Fair Copy

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Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780812298093
Pages : 320 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (298 downloads)

Download Fair Copy PDF Format Full Free by Jennifer Putzi and published by University of Pennsylvania Press. This book was released on 2021-10-29 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Fair Copy Jennifer Putzi studies the composition, publication, and circulation of American women's poetry in the antebellum United States. In opposition to a traditional scholarly emphasis on originality and individuality, or a recovery method centered on author-based interventions, Putzi proposes a theory and methodology of relational poetics: focusing on poetry written by working-class and African American women poets, she demonstrates how an emphasis on relationships between and among people and texts shaped the poems that women wrote, the avenues they took to gain access to print, and the way their poems functioned within a variety of print cultures. Yet it is their very relationality which has led to these poems and the poets who published them being written out of literary history. Fair Copy models a radical reading and recovery of this work in a way that will redirect the study of nineteenth-century American women's poetry. Beginning with Lydia Huntley Sigourney and ending with Elizabeth Akers Allen and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Putzi argues that relational practices like imitation, community, and collaboration distinguished the poetry of antebellum American women, especially those whose access to print was mediated by class or race. To demonstrate this point, she recovers poetry by the "factory girls" of the Lowell Offering, African American poet Sarah Forten, and domestic servant Maria James, whose volume Wales, and Other Poems was published in 1839. Putzi's work reveals a careful navigation of the path to print for each of these writers, as well as a fierce claim to poetry and all that it represented in the antebellum United States.

Download Death and the Moving Image PDF

Death and the Moving Image

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Publisher : Edinburgh University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780748630479
Pages : 273 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (63 downloads)

Download Death and the Moving Image PDF Format Full Free by Michele Aaron and published by Edinburgh University Press. This book was released on 2014-01-28 with total page 273 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Death and the Moving Image examines the representation of death and dying in mainstream cinema from its earliest to its latest renditions to reveal the ambivalent place of death in twentieth and twenty-first century culture: the ongoing split between its over- and under-statement, between its cold, bodily, realities and its fantastical, transcendental and, most importantly, strategic depictions. Our screens are steeped in death's dramatics: in spectacles of glorious sacrifice or bloody retribution, in the ecstasy of agony, but always in the promise of redemption. This book is about the staging of these dramatics in mainstream Western film and the discrepancies that fuel them and are, by return, fuelled by them. Exploring the impact of gender, race, nation or narration upon them, this groundbreaking study isolates how mainstream cinema works to bestow value upon certain lives, and specific socio-cultural identities, in a hierarchical and partisan way. Dedicated to the popular, to the political and ethical implications of mass culture's themes and imperatives, Death and the Moving Image takes this culture to task for its mortal economies of expendability. Ultimately, it also disinters the capacity for film, and film criticism, to engage with life and vulnerability differently and even generatively.

Download Revival and Awakening PDF

Revival and Awakening

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Publisher : University of Chicago Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780226145310
Pages : 432 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (145 downloads)

Download Revival and Awakening PDF Format Full Free by Adam H. Becker and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2015-03-09 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume examines how the presence of an American evangelical mission in the borderlands between Qajar Iran and the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century contributed to the development of a secular nationalism among the indigenous Neo-Aramaic speaking Christian population of the region. A particular evangelical configuration of modernity was cultivated at the mission in the antebellum period, one belonging to a visceral realm often unrecognised in characterisations of secularism and the Enlightenment.

Download The Modern Supernatural and the Beginnings of Cinema PDF

The Modern Supernatural and the Beginnings of Cinema

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Publisher : Springer
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ISBN 10 : 9781137583710
Pages : 209 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (583 downloads)

Download The Modern Supernatural and the Beginnings of Cinema PDF Format Full Free by Murray Leeder and published by Springer. This book was released on 2017-01-10 with total page 209 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study sees the nineteenth century supernatural as a significant context for cinema’s first years. The book takes up the familiar notion of cinema as a “ghostly,” “spectral” or “haunted” medium and asks what made such association possible. Examining the history of the projected image and supernatural displays, psychical research and telepathy, spirit photography and X-rays, the skeletons of the danse macabre and the ghostly spaces of the mind, it uncovers many lost and fascinating connections. The Modern Supernatural and the Beginnings of Cinema locates film’s spectral affinities within a history stretching back to the beginning of screen practice and forward to the digital era. In addition to examining the use of supernatural themes by pioneering filmmakers like Georges Méliès and George Albert Smith, it also engages with the representations of cinema’s ghostly past in Guy Maddin’s recent online project Seances (2016). It is ideal for those interested in the history of cinema, the study of the supernatural and the pre-history of the horror film.

Download Letters and Cultural Transformations in the United States, 1760-1860 PDF

Letters and Cultural Transformations in the United States, 1760-1860

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Publisher : Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
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ISBN 10 : 9781409475385
Pages : 290 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (475 downloads)

Download Letters and Cultural Transformations in the United States, 1760-1860 PDF Format Full Free by Professor Sharon M Harris and published by Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.. This book was released on 2013-04-28 with total page 290 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume illustrates the significance of epistolarity as a literary phenomenon intricately interwoven with eighteenth- and nineteenth-century cultural developments. Rejecting the common categorization of letters as primarily private documents, this collection of essays demonstrates the genre's persistent public engagements with changing cultural dynamics of the revolutionary, early republican, and antebellum eras. Sections of the collection treat letters' implication in transatlanticism, authorship, and reform movements as well as the politics and practices of editing letters. The wide range of authors considered include Mercy Otis Warren, Charles Brockden Brown, members of the Emerson and Peabody families, Margaret Fuller, Elizabeth Stoddard, Catherine Brown, John Brown, and Harriet Jacobs. The volume is particularly relevant for researchers in U.S. literature and history, as well as women's writing and periodical studies. This dynamic collection offers scholars an exemplary template of new approaches for exploring an understudied yet critically important literary genre.